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Forward Head Posture

Bad posture and PAIN:

Your mom always told you to sit up straight and don’t slouch. It’s hard to do isn’t it! Especially if all you do is looking down at your cell phone all day or reading and typing on a computer monitor. It’s almost a epidemic these day’s. Forward Head Posture is what all of us fight every day and more and more are loosing the battle. The muscles from the base of your skull goes all the way to the women’s bra line. As the day goes on and you sit at a computer do you get a burning pain in the top of your back or a headache? If you do then it can be caused by the head slowly loosing its natural curve as you age and you have no idea its happening. The loss of the curve causes these symptoms. Our passion is to fix spinal curves! We are the only office in the triad to offer Lasera non-surgical laser spinal rehab for posture. Heating the soft tissue muscle that is more like gristle than a flexible like a rubber band is key to correcting posture long term.

Our bodies are made to have our ear over shoulder, shoulder over hip, hip over knees and knees over the ankle in a straight line. As we age we have such things as weak arches that drop causing you to walk imperfectly thus causing stress on the muscles and joints. In my practice 8 out 10 patients typically have a combination of short legs as well. It may only be a few millimeters or a full inch. So when you walk with a leg length discrepancy you are no longer 50/50 weight distribution. How do you think your knees like that long term? They don’t! In my opinion this is the number one reason we see so many medial meniscus surgeries. Knees go in with the dropped arch short leg scenario time after time. Then eventually your hips rotate to compensate. The rotation of the hips will then cause the spine to subluxate (misalign). The spine uses alignment/normal motion to pump fluid in your discs. So, over time the short leg dropped arch can cause your disc to dehydrate then causing a disc to bulge or herniated due to degenerative disc dx (not enough fluid in the disc). The muscles are now contracting more on one side than the other the weight distribution is uneven (not walking 50/50 weight on the joints/muscles) and then all of sudden you have a pain that isn’t going away.

But you say, I work out all the time and I didn’t do anything to cause this pain. It’s similar to a dentist saying “you have tooth decay on this X-ray” but you say “i”ve been brushing”. You may have brushed but you didn’t get braces like you needed and now one tooth is pressing on the other causing decay. Another analogy is the symptom of a heart attack. You feel the pain in chest, arm or jaw but is that the cause? No, it’s the symptom coming from the heart which is the cause.

I hope you don’t wait for decay! Call now for your computerized posture evaluation today. See the great article below by CBS news and video on poor posture and phones.

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Watch THIS VIDEO if you want a second opinion.


OMG, you’re texting your way to back pain

By JESSICA FIRGER CBS NEWS November 14, 2014, 5:29 PM

Humans were designed to stand upright. And yet in this modern world, too many of us spend our days with our heads slumped over for a simple reason: we’re staring at the tiny screen of a smartphone.

People spend an average of 2 to 4 hours each day with their neck bent at this unnatural angle while shooting off emails or texts. That’s 700 to 1,400 hours a year. The success of social media is has led to an epidemic of bad smartphone posture.

The average adult head weighs 10 to 12 pounds when it’s in the upright or neutral position. However, because of that pesky thing called physics — gravitational pull — the cranium becomes heavier the more you bend your neck. Several times heavier, according to research from Dr. Kenneth Hansraj, chief of spine surgery at New York Spine Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine, which will be published in Surgical Technology International.

His study found that bending your head at a 60 degree angle to get a better look at your selfie is putting 60 pounds’ worth of pressure on your cervical spine, the portion of the spine above the shoulders. That’s more than the weight of the average 7 year old. “The weight seen by the spine dramatically increases when flexing the head forward at varying degrees,” write the authors in the study. “Loss of the natural curve of the cervical spine leads to incrementally increased stresses about the cervical spine. These stresses may lead to early wear, tear, degeneration and possibly surgeries.”

But it’s not just the big slump that could eventually cause you to look like Lurch. Tilting your head a mere 15 degrees puts 27 pounds of pressure on your spine; a 30 degree neck tilt could equal 40 pounds of pressure; a 45 degree tilt adds the force of 49 pounds.

It’s no secret that correct posture is better for your back. According to the researchers, “good posture is defined as ears aligned with the shoulders and the ‘angel wings,’ or the shoulder blades, retracted.”

“In proper alignment, spinal stress diminished,” they write in their paper. “It is the most efficient position for the spine.”

Standing tall doesn’t just make you look better, it optimizes your health, too. Other studies have found good posture elevates testosterone and serotonin in the body, and also reduces levels of the stress hormone cortisol. Good posture has even been linked to personality traits such as tolerance for risk-taking.

People who have poorer posture often have poorer physical and emotional health. The researchers define bad posture as “the head in a tilted forward position and the shoulders dropping forward in a rounded position.”

Bad posture has been linked to a host of medical problems, including headaches and other neurological problems, depression, constipation, and heart disease. At a minimum, constant slouching is likely to cause a lot of chronic pain.

This is why Hansraj said it’s important to be mindful of your smartphone posture.

“While it is nearly impossible to avoid the technologies that cause these issues, individuals should make an effort to look at their phones with a neutral spine and to avoid spending hours each day hunched over,” the authors write in their study.

© 2014 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.


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